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Fifty Year Old Burda Magazine: March 1969


I haven't had much time to sew lately, and when I'm not able to sew, I like to go through my old Burda magazines and get ideas.  My oldest Burdas are from 1969- not that I've been subscribing that long!  I bought almost the whole year of 1969 on Ebay a few years ago.   This is the March issue, so it's exactly 50 years old.  I've snapped some photos to share with you.  I don't speak German, so your guess is as good as mine as to what the text says, but the photos say a lot!


This was the cover story.  Without the hat, I think you could wear this today! But with the hat, it  really feels like a stewardess uniform.


I really like the giant houndstooth print of these dresses.  And take a look at those long pointed collars.  So many dresses were shown with neck scarves and belts too.


They really liked showing pairs of models together in coordinating colors. In current issues, models are rarely shown together unless it's a wedding or mother/daughter theme spread.



I really like the design of the cream colored dress.  Wouldn't it be nice if they would bring that one back?  Not many pairs of women's pants in this issue- just three.  Pants for women weren't mainstream yet.  I also have some issues from 1976, and by 1976, pants, and particularly pantsuits, were heavily promoted.


White footwear and kneesocks!  I definitely remember wearing knee socks with skirts as a kid.  They were always falling down so I had to keep them up with rubber bands.  I know that white footwear is making a comeback, so maybe the return of kneesocks isn't far behind!  Now that we have lycra, they would be a whole lot easier to keep up!



I like both of these dresses too.   Burda had seamstresses with impeccable skills- I'm sure that they still do.


A good section of the magazine was black and white.  I wonder if that odd hand position meant something.


These are super pretty jackets over matching dresses.   And side barrettes!  I almost forgot about them, but I always had my hair pulled back with a side barrette like that. 



These wrap dresses would totally be in place in 2019.  Diane Von Furstenberg was supposed to have invented the wrap dress in the 70's, but it looks to me like Burda beat her to it in 1969!


I LOVE that they used models that were of all ages and sizes.  Definitely, most of the models were younger and thinner, but at least they included some older and larger models in every issue.  Why don't they still do that?????? 


In these old issues, you didn't get every style in every size.  For example in the photo above, if you were a size 46, you could make the one on the left, and if you were a size 48, you get the one on the right!  I suppose people were very adept at grading between sizes.  We're pretty spoiled now with all of the multisize patterns.


There were a lot of pretty racy ads for underwear.  I don't think this ad would be PC today! 


And there were several ads for fabrics.  I think that there was a lot of innovation going on with the introduction of polyester and knits into society and seamstresses had to be sold on the idea. 


Burda also included some gorgeous interior decorating shots!  I just love this one.  If you lived in this house, you were pretty cool- Don Draper cool. 


Although I do like to dream, I will probably never actually make anything from these old issues.  Not only do I not speak German to understand their instructions, but I also don't speak whatever this nonsense is!  It's amazing anyone ever made anything, having to trace this tangled mess!

I hope that you've enjoyed this trip back to March of 1969!  What do you think of these styles?  Would you wear them today?

Happy Sewing!

Ann

2019 Resolution #1: Being Reflective


One night when I was going to yoga class, it was a rainy night and in the parking lot, I almost ran over a woman because I couldn't see her!  This got me thinking about how I could make my own work-out jacket more visible at night.  I had purchased a pack of pink reflective tape a couple of years ago when Hancock fabrics was going out of business.  It included three widths of tape that you just iron on.  I couldn't decide which width I liked best, so I used all three!  I added some of the wide width on the back, medium width on the sleeve seam and thin width at the front yoke.  I think that it really made the jacket a lot more interesting as well as making it safer to walk at night!


I made an entire set of workout wear to go with the jacket as well.  For my jacket, I used Butterick 6386 for the pattern.  For the leggings, I used Simplicity 8212.  All of my fabrics came from Fabric Mart.  I only used the printed knit to line the hood, and the majority of the jacket was made using navy and dusty blue solid activewear knits.   I sew all of them with a serger and then use a coverstitch for hems and neckbands.  
Both patterns worked well with minimal tweaking, and I would recommend both of them.  The jacket has some interesting lines, and I like the way the front pockets are worked in the curve of the front. Although I generally prefer things on the loose side, I discovered that you really do want your leggings to be snug.  Otherwise, they just look wrinkly which is not a good look!  There are quite a few legging patterns out there to choose from- some with pockets and different options for piecing.  I chose this one because it had both a simple version and a more complex version, two lengths, and two waistband heights.  I decided that I like the higher waistband, so it was nice to have the options.


The cording is white cotton cording that I dyed blue and then wrapped scotch tape around the ends to keep it from fraying.  I've done this method before, and it lasts.


I forgot to add length to the sleeves and they came up too short for me. Luckily I had enough of the navy knit to make cuffs to make the sleeves the right length for me.

The next piece that I made to go with the jacket was a tank top using Butterick 6571.  I chose this because of the diamond shape insert that I thought would reflect the diamond shapes in the print that I was using.  I left off the sleeves, and just bound the entire armhole.

The top part of the tank fit me well, but it was too snug in the midsection.  So, I added a triangle of the navy knit on the sideseams.    This was one of those "make it work" moments, but I think it actually improved the look, as it navy insert lines up well with the navy insert in the  capri length leggings.


For my second pair of leggings, I used a strip of the print in the front panel, and solid navy in the back panel, with the majority of the legging being made from the dusty blue knit.  These are View D of the legging pattern- the high rise capri.  I really like this legging pattern.  It's easy and fits just like a ready to wear legging would.


One thing that I find a little tricky with activewear knit is being able to tell the wrong side from the right side, as I believe that some of them are wicking and breathable, and if you reverse the sides, you might not get those wonderful benefits. So, I usually will stretch the knit and see which side the cut edge curls to, and I call that the right side.


If you've taken a yoga class, then you know that it's smart to bring something warm to wear both as you are warming up and cooling down, as the room might be chilly.  So, I made a loose fitting t-shirt out of a solid blue cotton/lycra knit using View A of Simplicity 1463.  I added 4 inches to the length of it, so that I could lift my arms and still have plenty of length.



So, altogether I made a jacket, 2 pairs of leggings- one full length and one capri length, 2 tops- one printed tank and one long sleeved solid t-shirt.  I should be set for a while!  I really loved making these pieces, and I know that I will love wearing them as well.





 Have you tried making your own activewear?  What has your experience been?

Happy Sewing!

Ann

The Treasure Hunt Coat



My first project of 2019, is one that was on my mind for the majority of 2018!  For me, sewing is as much about the hunt for the components of any project, as it is about the process of putting it all together.  I found this fabric last March, so I've been hunting for the rest of the components for several months before I cut into it.  I love searching through both old and new patterns, online fabric stores for new fabrics, thrift stores for old fabrics, and antique stores for notions.   When I have all of the components, then I will often go to consignment shops for the perfect purse, necklace or footwear to make the whole outfit.   I especially love it when I can find the components second hand because I know that there is a history behind them, and I imagine who the previous owner was and what they were thinking of making.


I found this blue wool plaid last March at our Idea Store- a reuse recycle store that I wrote about here.  It was a large piece, and I suspected that it was handwoven because at the end of the piece, it had some pink yarns.  We have a group of spinners and weavers in our community, and they make some amazingly beautiful pieces.  Then, when I was cutting it, I found a hand-written note, confirming my suspicions that it was made by a person, not a mill!  The note said "Coat Length", so I was glad to know that the original maker had intended it would end up being a coat.  I felt a bit humbled, and thought- "Whoa- this is an amazing piece of fabric, and I better not mess it up!" What an honor to make something from a piece of cloth that someone else had put a lot of time and undoubtedly love into creating it!  So, I did my best to do justice to the piece, taking my time to make it.


At some point, I also picked up this pattern, Butterick 3260 at the IDEA store, and decided it would be a good choice with the simple lines, making the plaids easy to match.  This said the copyright was 2001, so it had sufficiently aged.  I did a full bust adjustment so that the coat wouldn't hike up in the front.  And then I lengthened the body by 3" and also lengthened the pockets by 3", as I wanted them to be able to hold a lot!